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to the county. >> reporter: but now they are trumped by a new state law. besides lobbying by the environmentist groups. >> i spent two and a half weeks trying to walk on every legislative door. >> reporter: but governor brown, he signs san francisco assembly legislation that prohibits the local voters from restricting the importation of trash into a privately owned landfill. >> for me it is a huge disappointment to see the governor sign that there. >> reporter: and they feel like the other state is clearly telling them that the will of the people doesn't count. >> when the voters make a decision, about what is best in their community, i mean i think that we have as local government have a responsibility to do everything that we can to implement that in the best possible way. >> reporter: even though it was a local solano measure that assigned the law, but they say that the issue will go way beyond the county line if it was not passed. and the risk of every county and city almost across the state is having to manage their own garbage could become a reality, which would drive up cost, which would
change the law of the land on affirmative action. wyatt andrews was in the court today. >> reporter: abigail fisher was denied admission to the university of texas, she says, because of admission policies that favored less-qualified minorities. her simple argument is to stop using skin color in college admission. >> i hope the court rules that a student's race and ethnicity should not be considered when applying to the university of texas. >> reporter: the u.t. entering class is among the most diverse anywhere, roughly 50% white and 50% minority. by law, the school has to admit the top 10% of every high school class, regardless of race. but u.t. also uses what's called "holistic review," where race is separately considered with other factors, including leadership and family income. the university says that's legal under a 2003 ruling from justice sandra day o'connor. it allowed colleges to use race to find a critical mass of underrepresented minority students. but the court's conservative justices repeatedly asked when does the use of race end? liberal justice sonia sotomayor, defen
, but the seattle-based company says is also has to exwrie with all labor laws. >>> a job fair for young adults kicks off in a few hours in south san jose. the fifth annual youth job fair starts at 9:00 this morning at oak ridge mall. the event is organized by vice mayor madison, and nancy pyle. it's open to those ages 16 to 21. they will have a chance to meet face to face with employers. that will be at the nordstrom rack courtyard and ends at noon. >>> a very strange discovery along a beach. coming up the theories behind that giant eyeball that washed up in florida. >>> and the new rumors are starting, the latest buzz about apple about to introduce its new version of the ipad. >>> unlimited free coverage for apple. how do they do it? as we have mostly clear skies around the bay area, numbers are mostly in the 40s. that's going to change for the first time in a while. sunshine. we'll have the forecast after the break. ,, today... people in most of a clara county will forever cn the way they d >>> one week from today people in most of santa clarita county will forever change the way they di
think it's perfectly reasonable that if megan's laws were passed for the first time today, it would definitely include electronic identifiers. so this is merely a reasonable step forward. >> reporter: prop 35 would also increase penalties. traffickers now face five to eight years in prison. the ballot initiative would raise that to 12 years to life and it would push up maximum fines from 100 grand to $1.5 million. >> you really do need to have a penalty that actually gets somebody's attention and causes them to redirect their behavior. >> reporter: but not everyone is on board. former prostitute and sex worker advocate fears it will keep sex workers from reporting crimes against themselves. >> because prop 35 does not have any equal protection for sex workers. there's no way for sex workers to come and report when we're victims of crime like rape, robbery, theft, coercion and extortion to the police because they are most likely to investigate us and arrest us for prostitution than to go after a perpetrator. >> reporter: she is not the only one concerned about proposition 356789 the
their job because they are undocumented. starbucks' policy is to comply with all labor laws. now, in california, starbucks says it doesn't use everify that program that checks to see whether a person is here in the country legally or not. starbucks says that la boulange didn't use it either. >> sharon, you did talk to an employee who said he was an american citizen. did you talk to any others and were they having a problem with what this may possibly do? >> yeah. for example, the very first gentleman that we talked to the one wanted his face as well as his voice disguised said he got that letter he saw a picture of that letter that he is one who is an illegal immigrant worked for the company at la boulange for years and said he is upset. he worked for the company, invested his time and care in the company and now suddenly because lack of being a citizen he is being asked to leave. he says some people in the same boat as he are looking for other jobs and others of them have two jobs. so yeah. >>> it's like a wild movie plot in l.a. i mean, look at this. a surreal sight to say the
interest in law to tell people about this? >> we do believe genetically engineered foods are a problematic, health concerns, leads to allergies and health effects showing up in the studies that have been done. environmental problems. yesterday, the new york times had a story about the massive increases in pesticide use over the last 15 years of genetically engineered crops, tied to the crops. >> is your goal to end genetically modified foods? >> it's to give consumers the choice, that's how the market is suppose to working. we decide, voting with dollars, making choices about what we eat and feed families, about what we want in the food system. >> the bottom line for families listening, is this going to increase the cost at the grocery store? the no on campaign says yes. it's going to cost hundreds of extra dollars a year to require the labels. >> they have no evidence to back that up. we think no increased cost will come of the law, it didn't happen in europe and didn't happen when we asked for trans fats. it gives them 18 months to do it. it's a straight forward labeling law. >> yes on
, including scott weiner. >> you're convicted of domestic violence, you shouldn't be the chief elected law enforcement officer in san francisco. and so i felt very strongly about that. >> reporter: but the board needed 9 of the 11 supervisors' votes to remove mirkarimi from office. those voting in his favor the woman the mayor appointed to mirkarimi's former seat on the board owe laying, olague, campos, avalos, kim. >> i don't think the mayor was in the wrong. i don't think it was a witch hunt. i think given the circumstances that were take place that it was absolutely appropriate and this was the outcome. >> reporter: we are going to be hearing from the mayor this afternoon. he is going to have a press conference around 1:00. we are also going to be hearing this afternoon from the district attorney george gascon. so a lot of reaction coming in. weird vibe here at city hall today. we are going to have the latest for you on cbs 5 at 5:00 and 6:00. and also continue to follow the story on cbssf.com. live in san francisco, anne makovec, cbs 5. >> thank you. >>> some developing news at this no
to detect and it's not illegal. >> reporter: so there's nothing against the law about gaming the system but what is there about the system that allows it to be gamed here. >> we use a blend of gas not used anywhere else in the country. as a result, when we get know a supply problem, we can't import gasoline that's used in other parts of the country to smooth out that shortage. >> reporter: while the governor's order to allow the winter blend gas to come in is not a long-term answer, at this point the public will take any relief they can get. >> it all counts. 4 gallons for 22 bucks. not cool. >> reporter: it's not cool for any of the drivers here having to pay this much especially when the rest of the nation's gas is even lower than ours by about a dollar. the question, the timing of this? there is nothing like this to get people upset and after all, the election is just a couple of weeks away. >> the timing has people moving. >> whatever. as long as it drops a dime a gallon by midweek. that's all i care about. phil matier at the pumps, thanks. >>> of course what goes up generally comes
into custody. it seems todd knew about maritime law and filed a legal salvage claim against this boat. >> how sharp was this guy. >> reporter: he says a case from 1869 establishes the right of a person to be compensated for rescuing a vessel adrift on the sea. >> on the sea... that boat's going to get sunk or ripped up or that property is going to get destroyed. and because of the pearls of the sea, it's important to energize and motivate strangers to save the property for the benefit of the owner. >> reporter: but the french team's lawyer disagrees. he says the salvage rules shouldn't apply in the bay especially to todd who works at the docks. >> there is an additional rule that we don't want to incentivize people to people who have a duty to render aid to go and claim a ship or boat and then hold it hostage. >> reporter: hagey says the entire french time is in limbo as the boat sits in storage waiting for some kind of settlement. one report says an offer of $25,000 has been made but a court would evaluate the amount based on the value of the boat and the effort it took to save it. >> okay.
. i went to law school and wanted to work in service. i served in the white house under president carter. i went back and practiced law. i wasn't that great of a lawyer and not a great demand of service. i decided to do something different. i start ad company and it took off. so i did get fortunate to make more money than i probably can spend and therefore i'm committed to giving away the bulk of it. >> when you started your company you were 38 years old. you were telling me in the green room that believes kids today, young people today should try many things before the age of 30 because before 30 you really don't know. very few mark zuckerberg. >> very few people know what they want to do in their 20s. people should find what they enjoy not what their parents want to do and you have to experiment. you should try many different things. i did many different things. i was in government, i practiced law. not until your mid-30s do you know what you want to do. >> gayle, he's like your son and like me, a duke graduate and has done a lot of wonderful things. >> he's on the cover of "for
death. the nationwide law that he says will save the children's lives coming up next. ,,,, [ female announcer ] this is the story of eves. [ eves ] years ago, i hurt my shoulder drag racing. that's when i decided to take it easy, so i took up hang gliding. [ female announcer ] a grandpa who refuses to grow up. [ eves ] the pain was bad, but the thought of not being a hang glider pilot was worse. [ female announcer ] that's when eves turned to sutter health's palo alto medical foundation. [ eves ] the doctors that i dealt with, they got it, that this old guy wanted to return as a hang glider pilot. they got me flying again. [ female announcer ] palo alto medical foundation, and sutter health -- our story is you. peaking. prices jumped only >>> california gasoline prices are still the highest in the country, but they may be peaking. prices jumped only a fraction of a cent overnight. nine days ago we were paying $4.17 on average for regular gas. now it's $4.67 a gallon, a $0.50 jump. all of a sudden electric car sales are booming. cbs5 reporter len ramirez finds out if they really give
death. the nationwide law that he says will save ,,,,,,,, get sleep train's very best mattresses at the guaranteed lowest price. plus, pay no interest for 3 years on the best brand-name mattress sets. get your best rest ever from sleep train. ♪ your ticket to a better night's sleep ♪ peaking. prices jumped only >>> california gasoline prices are still the highest in the country, but they may be peaking. prices jumped only a fraction of a cent overnight. nine days ago we were paying $4.17 on average for regular gas. now it's $4.67 a gallon, a $0.50 jump. all of a sudden electric car sales are booming. cbs5 reporter len ramirez finds out if they really give you the bang for your buck. >> all right. and i'm going to be driving, up we go. >> reporter: he just bought a plug-in hybrid and now feels like a genius, especially after driving past the gas station pumping octanoate nearly $5 a gallon. >> i'm glad i bought this car because i bought it thee weeks ago driving 567 miles on the owe come terp odometer and still haven't put any gas in it. >> the sales of the volt and the other
dispensaries. it claims federal officials promised not to raid dispensaries that follow state law and that shutting down the facility would send patients to the black market. >>> another suit in the news is a move to stop at least part of the central subway under construction here in san francisco. the suit says it's against the city charter to use union square for an entrance to that subway. today federal officials are expected to announce nearly a $1 billion federal for that subway project. >>> time now 4:41. hope to heartbreak. a body is found during the search for a missing colorado girl. >> plus, are we throwing away expired medications too soon? the results of a new ucsf study. >> and the bizarre chase through the streets of oakland when we come back. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, weaved in and out of traffi, ed up on sidewalks, >>> cameras catch a joyride through oakland on an atv. for several minutes this guy weaving in and out of traffic jumped up on sidewalks, ran through stop lights, stop signs and disappeared under a group of trees. now, we initially heard he was being chased but oak
to owotect civilians, they vow to protect democracy, they vow to naey international laws. ep reporter: making vows is easy. >> yes. >> reporter: sticking to them is much harder. >> yes. >> reporter: how can you be sure >> e mt these men are going to stick to those vows? >> well, this is what you do. you provide and you check and you provide and you check and you provide and you check. and you make sure that they are standing for their values. >> pelley: clarissa, as you say in your story, the free syrian army is really not so much an army but a bunch of militias with different agendas. you've been reporting from syria from the very beginning. who are the rebels today? >> scott, think back to my first trip to damascus a year ago. people were talking about freedom, dignity, they were talking about democracy. nobody even mentioned religion. w w you have rebel fighters who are actively calling this a jihad. and part of the reason for that f that this fight has been going on for so long and the syrian people have paid such an enormous price that they really feel deeply disappointed and even active
was found guilty of 45 counts of child sexual abuse back in june. by law, those counts would add up to a minimum of 220 years behind bars. at least two of the victims are expected to talk today at the hearing. >>> time now 6:10 "curiosity"'s first big scoop. what the rover pulled from the surface of mars. >> and waiting to jump from the edge of space. will weather interfere with one man's plan to break the sound barrier? >> must win for baseball teams. will the home field advantage help the as turn things around? we're live in oakland with as host kara tsuboi. hi, i'm amy for downy unstopables in-wash scent boosters, here with my favorite new intern, jimmy. mmm! fresh! and it's been in the closet for 12 weeks! unbelievable! unstopables! i'll show you how! ♪ just shake them into the washer i can't believe this lasts 12 weeks! neither can they. so you're going on tour to prove it. downy unstopables. follow jimmy's unstopables tour for free samples on downy.com. surface of plane >>> take a look. nasa officials say the "curiosity" rover has made its first scoop of the planet mars su
since in her view he must have surely broken some laws. her comments were made during the time abu hamza railed against britain from his mosque in north london. or a fourth stray of straight day, syria and turkey traded tre today. l 's the least sign syria's civil war is now expanding into a threat to regional security. correspondent holly williams is in istanbul. in il reporter: syria's civil war is spilling over its borders. today, the turkish village of guvecci was hurt by two mortar shells. nobody was hurt it & it's thought they were a mistake. the turkish military returns fire for the fourth day in a row. turkey has openly sided with the eebels in syria's conflict, confh so far, it hasn't intervened directly. now some fear that border skirmishes between the two countries could escalate into a regional war. on wednesday, a mortar bomb fired from syria killed five civilians in a turkish border town, including a mother and her three children. in response, the turkish parliament voted to approve the use of force against syria if it's deemed necessary. today, turkey's department prime mi
. and cost medicare an estimated 17.5 billion dollars. >> to control costs the health-care reform law penalizes hospitals with high readmission rates. they'll actually lose some of that medicare reimbursement money. nationwide that could cost hospitals 290 million dollars in just the next year. >> we realized there were gaps in care once patients left the hospital. >> dr. michael landberg is the chief medical officer at cedars-sinai. since last november his hospital has been working to reduce readmissions, sending medical staff to monitor the health of frequent flyer patients like freda robbins at home. >> in '98 over 52. >> in the past year the hospital reports a 60% reduction in its readmission rate saving an estimated $4 million to medicare and private insurance. >> we can actually find solutions to this problem that is good for the patient and good for our community. >> take a deep breath, in and out. >> robbins is just glad that her days as a frequent flyer are over. >> good. >> i'm just going to stay home. >> you're getting off board. >> i am absolutely getting off board. >> the
way but a key part of the season is to be determined not on field but in a court of law. we have a report on prayer, cheerleaders and right to free speech. >> reporter: friday night under the lights in texas with the band, the fans, the players and something different. a banner with a christian message written by the school's cheerleaders. >> we thought it would be a great message to get across. >> reporter: that message is at the center of a legal battle, the school superintendent banned the religious themed banners last month when a wisconsin group claimed they violate the separation of church and state. a judge has allowed the practice to continue until he rules. there were more religious signs than ever before from friends and family who say the cheerleaders messages on the banners are free speech. >> both the united states constitution and the texas constitution guarantee the right to freely express your religious viewpoints. >> reporter: the cheerleaders parents have hired an attorney to keep the christian banners. he says because the girls decided to use the bible verses o
speed freak murder victims. thanks to a mom on her own mission for answers. it's a discovery law enforcement on the case either didn't know about or kept secret. >> that is truly shameful. i have to thank joanne hobson's family, because they received their daughter's remains, and rather than just accepting it, they went to the trouble of having it tested. >> reporter: now a new test for this mother, missing her daughter for 24 years. mckayla garrett's remains may now be located. >> i don't know how else to live, because we've lived this way for so long, searching for mckayla and hoping that she would come home. >> reporter: a lot for this mother to take in tonight. she says she's now waiting for these test results to come back from virginia. she has no idea what the timetable on that could be. >> steve, thank you very much. >>> bay area survives to play another day. unbelievable. >> coming around, and the oakland a's will live another day! >> can you believe this? it was a real nail biter too. the a's stay alive to the bottom of the ninth to beat the tigers. the tigers ahead by t
the subway entrance plan for union square. it cites a city law that prohibits nonrecreational uses in city parks. that suit wants the station moved or put up for a vote. >>> an oakland high school student's simple idea has turned into a big help for her peers. >> it wasn't even a very big deal for me until i realized how big a deal it was for them. >> the project that has everyone walking a little taller coming up. >> two teams, two comebacks, one great day for bay area baseball. the secret to getting coveted potential championship tickets without breaking your wallet, after the break. >> it has been cloudy and cool but fairly inactive right now. that may all change this afternoon. we'll talk about that next. hi, i'm amy for downy unstopables in-wash scent boosters, here with my favorite new intern, jimmy. mmm! fresh! and it's been in the closet for 12 weeks! unbelievable! unstopables! i'll show you how! ♪ ♪ just shake them into the washer i can't believe this lasts 12 weeks! neither can they. so you're going on tour to prove it. downy unstopables. fol
regulation. that's because massachusetts law says compounding pharmacies which mix custom made medicines must have a prescription for every patient for each dose it sends out. necc shipped the tainted steroid out to medical facilities in bulk without these prescriptions. cbs news called the necc for a response. the company did not immediately respond. government health officials acknowledge there's a regulatory gap when it comes compounding pharmacies. for instance massachusetts does not have the authority to track how many vials of a drug are produced. at the federal level the food and drug administration does not have clear authority to examine records in a compounding pharmacy. fda is seeking more authority. this pharmacist served on a package creating federal regulations for the compounding pharmacy industry. >> who is minding the store in terms of regulation? >> the fda has worked very hard over the last several years to try to promulgate regulations, to clearly define when does a compounding pharmacy exceed its pharmacy and become a manufacturer under the purview of the fda. >> the cdc
as a vegetable on school lunch menus. they wrote a lot of the health care reform law. thurber estimates $9 billion is spent every year on lobbying and related advocacy, a top lobbyist can make millions the influence of business in washington d.c. is the third largest business after government and tourism. i think there's probably 100,000 people in the industry, not lobbyists specifically but in the industry supporting all of that in washington. >> reporter: and what do clients expect from their lobbyists? we asked gary lauer, ceo of a $150 million california firm called e-health insurance, a website that lets customers shop for health insurance from 180 companies. >> i was interested in getting some lobbyists, a, who had high credibility and, b, who could frankly get some doors open so we could explain what the situation was and what we think the remedy would be. >> reporter: specifically he was seeking to change the rules of health care reform so low-income americans can use government subsidies to buy insurance througcompanies like e-health. lobbyist lanny davis agreed to represent e hea
for the next court appearance. >> her daughter's presence in law enforcement custody at the safeway was not enough for her to return to the scene. so i didn't think the court or the people would be comfortable that she would return to court. >> erico is being held on $500,000 bail. she is due back in court on october 16th to enter a plea. >>> a bay area man's death overseas has triggered an international health scare. cbs 5 reporter cate caugiran explains it all traces back to a sick bat. >> reporter: it's the county's first death fr rabies in almost two decades. >> rabies still does exist in california. however, it is rare. >> reporter: a 34-year-old contra costa man died from the disease in switzerland in july. once the cdc found out, a full blown investigation started. >> there were four people that we identified that may have had contact with his saliva or other body fluids. three of those did and we offered post-exposure prophylaxis or treatment to them and they received those injections. >> reporter: investigators discovered four months before he died, the man came in contact
of 45 counts of child sexual abuse back in june. by law, those counts would add up to a minimum of 220 years behind bars. despite his conviction, though, sandusky insisted in an audio statement that he is innocent of all the charges. >> they can take away my life, they can make me out as a monster. they can treat me as a monster, but they can't take away my heart." >> sandusky also blamed his arrest and conviction on a conspiracy crafted by accusers, investigators and the media. relatives of the former coach are expected to submit letters of support while at least two victims will address sandusky today directly. >>> the nationwide meningitis outlook has claimed its ninth victim of the the latest death was reported last night in nashville, tennessee. cdc says as many as 13,000 people received steroid shots contaminated with that fungus that can cause the deadly disease. the medication has been recalled in 23 states. it could affect patients injected for pain in the back, knees and shoulders. the outbreak has sickened 105 people all across the country. >>> the search continues for a yos
-effective. emeryville did away with theirs in june. >> smaller city so they might --they're more law-abiding citizens in emeryville. >> reporter: in oakland the cameras are set up so not every violator is caught. >> the camera doesn't click unless you're moving 15 miles an hour. so for all those rolling red turns which is --there's one intersection in particular, you have to be really moving right through that intersection before you get a ticket. >> reporter: some members of the city council want to explore something else. studies show lengthening the duration of the yellow light can prevent more collisions than a camera. and it's not clear if the cameras are having the desired effect. police say some of the intersections have seen fewer collisions. some have not. >> that's why it's hard for to us make a decision. so i mean, i am asking for more information. >> reporter: councilmembers say since more information is need, they don't think they will vote tonight. instead they will go back to staff ask them to meet with the police department and traffic engineers to provide more analysis and after that
with the prosecutor that she could be a flight risk. >> her daughter's presence in law enforcement custody at the safeway wasn't enough for her to return to the scene. so i didn't think the court or the people would be comfortable that if we released her today that she would come back to court just to make a court appearance. >> reporter: miss keelin allegedly abandoned her 10-year- old daughter while caught shoplifting last week fleeing all the way to nevada where she was discovered. she was just returned to santa clara county last night. she is due to be back in court on october 16th to enter a plea so for now, she is going to remain in santa clara county on $50,000 bail. reporting live in morgan hill, len ramirez, cbs 5. >>> other bay area headlines. san francisco's new roman catholic leader is on probation for the next three years. archbishop salvatore cordileone pleaded guilty this week to misdemeanor reckless driving stemming from his dui arrest in august down in san diego. at his installation mass yesterday, the archbishop called the incident a terrible error in judgment. >>> the dr
if we did there's nothing illegal about that. >> reporter: so there's nothing against the law about gaming the system. but what is there about the system that allows it to be gamed here in california as opposed to other states? >> reporter: the problem is we use a blend of gasoline not used anywhere else in the country. as a result when we get into a supply problem, we can't import gasoline used in other parts of the country to smooth out that shortage. >> reporter: and while the governor's order to allow the winter blend gas to come in is no long-term answer to the problem, at this point the public will take any relief they can get. >> it all counts. 22 bucks, huh? oh, not really cool, huh? >> reporter: and that message was heard here and in sacramento and it was heard in washington. and ken, you're right. we have seen investigations like this before. and they haven't come up with anything other than california's got its own blend of gas, that's how we do it, and if the system starts to crack, that's when the prices spike. but nonetheless, calls for investigations, you think it mig
in june. by law, those counts would add up to a minimum of 220 years in prison. despite his conviction, sandusky insisted in an audio statement that he is innocent of all charges. >> "they can take away my life. they can make me out as a monster. they can treat me as a monster, but they can't take away my heart." >> sandusky also blamed his arrest and conviction on a conspiracy crafted by accusers, investigators and the media. relatives of the former coach are expected to submit letters of support while at least two victims will address sandusky today directly. >>> a ninth person has died in the growing nationwide meningitis outbreak. the latest death was reported last night in nashville, tennessee. cdc says as many as 13,000 people received steroid shots contaminated with that fungus that can cause the deadly disease. the medication has been recalled in 23 states. the outbreak has sickened 105 people all across the country. >>> a contest to win a python at a pet store turned deadly in florida. yesterday, a 32-year-old man who won the competition by eating dozens of cockroaches quickly
in june. >> smaller city so they might -- they're more law-abiding citizens in emeryville. >> reporter: in oakland the cameras are set up so not every violator is caught. >> the camera doesn't click unless you're moving 15 miles an hour. so for all those rolling red turns which is -- there's one intersection in particular, you have to be really moving right through that intersection before you get a ticket. >> reporter: some members of the city council want to explore something else. studies show lengthening the duration of the yellow light can prevent more collisions than a camera. and it's not clear if the cameras are having the desired effect. police say some of the intersections have seen fewer collisions. some have not. >> that's why it's hard for to us make a decision. so i mean, i am asking for more information. >> reporter: councilmembers say since more information is need, they don't think they will vote tonight. instead they will go back to staff ask them to meet with the police department and traffic engineers to provide more analysis and after that, they will take a vote on
it had 200,000 signatures in favor of the proposed law. >>> other bay area headlines a serial arsonist in san jose struck again last night after another dumpster was found burning on the city's west side. good samaritans had that fire on delna manor lane put out by the time for a crews got there but this is the ninth fire in that area of downing and south bascomb avenues. >>> fire investigators in union city say a four-alarm blaze at the alvarado place shopping center started in the back of the complex. ten businesses were damaged in the fire early wednesday morning. the search for the cause of the fire continues. >>> well, sick animals at the oakland zoo are getting extra tlc. today zoo officials opened the new state-of-the-art veterinary hospital to treat more than 600 animals and 96 different species at the zoo. it replaces the older smaller clinic. >> we'll work out of a true hospital with the facilities that can cover the full spectrum of the type of animals we have. little frogs all the way to giant zebras to tigers to chimpanzees. it gives us a great sense of confidence that we
in accordance with the massachusetts licensing regulation. that is because massachusetts law says compounding pharmacies, which mix custom-made medicines, must have a prescription for every patient for each dose they send out. it appears necc shipped the tainted violation of steroid to medical facilities in bulk without these prescriptions. >> today, government health officials acknowledge there is a regulatory gap when it comes to compounding pharmacies. for instance, massachusetts does not have the authority to track how many violation of a drug are produced at the federal level, the food and drug administration does not have clear authority to examine records in a compounding pharmacy. the f.d.a. is seeking more authority. pharmacist eric kastango served on a panel creating federal safety standards for the compounding pharmacy industry. who is minding the store in terms of regulation? >> the f.d.a. has worked very hard over the last several years to try to promulgate regulations to clearly define when does a compounding pharmacy exceed its authority and become a manufacturer under the purv
in light of california's new social media privacy law. suggestions to help keep control of your friends and followers? well, first, use personal email to set up your social media accounts. don't reference your company in your screen name or profile pick and think twice before sharing your password with coworkers. >>> maybe it's the economy or the popularity of going green but this year, halloween costumes swaps are popping up everywhere. a group called green america is sponsoring more than 150 costume swaps across the country this weekend. alameda is holding its swap this saturday. from furry creatures to elmo to m&ms all you need is a costume to contribute. organizers say swapping saves more than money. it helps save the environment by keeping costumes out of landfills. >>> the u.s. postal service announced as of january 27, you'll be paying one cent more. the first class stamp will now cost 33 cents a forever stamp 46 and they are introducing a new global forever stamp that allows you to mail a letter anywhere in the world for a dollar ten. now, other prices are also going up. it's on
federal officials promised not to raid dispensaries that follow state law and that shutting down the facility would send patients to the black market. >>> about 20 protestors could face charges after clashing with police in san francisco. the protest began yesterday afternoon as a group called homes not jails marched down 18th street and broke in a vacant building on castro street. police eventually stormed the building and arrested the people inside. the protest coincided with world homeless day. >>> a suit is filed in a move to stop at least part of the central subway under construction in san francisco. the suit says it's against the city charter to use union square for an entrance to the subway. today federal officials are expected to announce nearly one billion federal dollars for the subway project. >>> 5:41 now. we got new details about lance armstrong's alleged doping. the elaborate scheme his team is accused of running. >> plus holding bp accountable. the possible settlement in the gulf oil spill. ,, there's a place, a dark place, we go. an uncharacteristically negative
military so they can enforce the law. >> nick christoph in "the new york times" has chronicled the gender-based crime against women. congo, as you just said, is the epicenter of that. >> that's absolutely true. nick's done a good job. i was one of the producers on his movie "reporter." he's the reason i first got involved in the congo because i started reading about his travels and the atrocities that he's seen and some of the warlords that he's met. i went back, interviewed some of the same people and traveled around to what i thought was the conflict matrix. >> what happens when ben affleck hits the ground? >> it gets a lot more attention. it gets networks to go and spend time talking about the drc. it gets these guys engaged, and it gets people to pay attention. he talks about -- or we talk about in the piece really using that celebrity as a currency to get people to take note. >> i'm now thinking about congo and chocolate. i never put those together. >> let me tell you, you saw the coco that was being manufactured. you saw how it was brought up to these international standards. we hoo
through a state law, the 10% plan that guarantees admission to students no matter their race from the top 10% of their class. but ut admits other students by what it call holistic review, using factors that include test scores, leadership potential and race and it's this policy that's being challenged. >> what are the stakes here? >> the stakes are tremendous. >> reporter: more than 70 groups from civil rights organizations to former military leaders to some of the largest corporations in the country have all asked the court to maintain some use of race in admissions. warning the loss of diversity would harm business, the training of military leaders and the quality of education. >> all students would suffer, not just black and latino students. all students benefit from learning together inside the classroom and out. >> reporter: they've expressed the concern over the use of racial preferences, meaning affirmative action is very much on the line here today. the last time the court reviewed this, just as sandra day o'connor speculated, that race preferences might not be needed after 25 yea
new laws because the fda said yesterday, one of the attorneys, spokesperson said we simply don't have the regulations we need now in order to address this situation. >> dr. jon lapook has been following this closely. thank you, doctor. we appreciate it. >>> this morning also the boy scouts of america organization is accused of a century-long cover-up hiding evidence of sexual abuse by scout leaders. as john blackstone reports, the secrecy is ending with a wave of evidence now posted online for everyone to see. >> reporter: tom stewart became a cub scout in 1970 and almost immediately became a victim of his scout master. >> i was in scouting with my brother, matt. and we were sexually abused for the better part of ten years from age 8 to 18. >> reporter: he says he is just one of many boy scouts who have been molested by those they trusted. >> it's not easy for me to get up here and talk about this. but, you know i do want to speak for all the victims that can't speak for themselves. >> reporter: there have been hundreds, if not thousands of other v
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